2 Easy Ways to determine your Ring Size

1) The first option is to get your size from your ring which fits you perfectly.

diamond ringAll you need to do is to find out the diameter of the inner circle of the ring (in millimetres or centimetres) and tally it with the “ring size chart” (see the list below) on the website to know the size of your ring.

In order to calculate the diameter of your finger, (length of the straight line joining the two opposite sides of the inner circle of the ring) you can directly use a simple ruler or trace the inner circle on a piece of paper with a sharp pencil and perform the measurement accordingly.

2) Measure Your Finger (Circumference)

STEP 1: To get the measurement of your finger, you can either use a piece of string or print out our finger sizer.

Wrap the string or paper around your ring finger so that it sits comfortably. Make sure it’s not too tight or too loose. Next, mark the point where the two ends meet. You can use a ruler or other measurement device to determine the length of the portion of paper/string.

STEP 2: In the table below, look under the column INSIDE CIRCUMFERENCE. Select the unit of measurement you used and you can now obtain your corresponding measurement in inches or millimetres.

THAT’S IT!

Inside

Inside

Inside

Inside

Number Sizes

Number Sizes

Wheat Sheaf

Diameter

Diameter

Circumference

Circumference

Singapore

US/Canada

British

(mm)

(inches)

(mm)

(inches)

#

#

#

14.1

0.554

44.2

1.74

4

3

F

14.3

0.562

44.8

1.765

5

3 1/4

F 1/2

14.7

0.578

46.1

1.815

6

3 3/4

G 1/2

14.9

0.586

46.7

1.84

7

4

H

15.3

0.602

48

1.89

8

4 1/2

I

15.7

0.618

49.3

1.941

9

5

J 1/2

16.1

0.634

50.6

1.991

10

5 1/2

K 1/2

16.5

0.65

51.8

2.041

11

6

L 1/2

16.7

0.658

52.5

2.066

12

6 1/4

M

16.9

0.666

53.1

2.091

13

6 1/2

M 1/2

17.3

0.682

54.4

2.141

14

7

N 1/2

17.7

0.698

55.7

2.192

15

7 1/2

O 1/2

18.1

0.714

56.9

2.242

16

8

P 1/2

18.5

0.73

58.2

2.292

17

8 1/2

Q 1/2

18.9

0.746

59.5

2.342

18

9

R 1/2

19.4

0.762

60.8

2.393

19

9 1/2

S 1/2

19.8

0.778

62.1

2.443

20

10

T 1/2

20

0.786

62.7

2.468

21

10 1/4

U

20.2

0.794

63.3

2.493

22

10 1/2

U 1/2

20.6

0.81

64.6

2.543

23

11

V 1/2

21

0.826

65.9

2.594

24

11 1/2

W 1/2

21.4

0.842

67.2

2.644

25

12

X 1/2

21.8

0.858

68.4

2.694

26

12 1/2

Z

22.2

0.874

69.7

2.744

27

13

Beware of Repairs – Ring sent to China for repair and is lost. What’s this about?

Hopefully this isn’t a case of “he said/she said,” but while searching the Internet for wedding rings, I came across an interesting article on The Consumerist.

Jennifer and her husband bought her diamond wedding ring set from Kay’s Jewelers back in 2006, and an accompanying anniversary band about a year later. Part of their purchase involved an extended warranty, which at first glance seems like a good idea. After all, all jewelry will show signs of wear and tear over time.

After some time, one of her rings needed a repair. Apparently a diamond was damaged, and Jennifer suspects that it happened during a routine cleaning. The ring was shipped to the appropriate vendor in China, and after some time it looks as if it is lost.

Part of the warranty states that she can indeed be refunded what she paid for the ring, but instead wants what the ring was appraised for, which is a few hundred dollars more.

So – how could all this have been avoided?

In my humble opinion, it’s often best to make your jewelry purchases from an established retail jewelry store, or even from an online store that has a solid history of good reviews.

A mall chain store may seem to have some great jewelry deals, but a lot of the time these same stores do rely on imported goods that can be somewhat inferior in quality. Jewelry will require maintenance, and small diamonds can indeed break.

Even big diamonds may break during the setting process, and this is a reality in jewelry manufacturing. Often, it’s best to pay a little more for American made jewelry because it’s true – in the jewelry business, many times you get what you pay for. A great “deal” may not be a great deal after all.